Summary Data

The incidence rates per 100 full-time workers for total nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for Missouri and All United States in 2003 and 2004 are shown in Chart 1.  The incidence rate for both Missouri and All United States was 5.0 in 2003.  The incidence rate for Missouri increased to 5.3 in 2004, while the incidence rate for All United States decreased to 4.8.

Chart 2 presents a comparison of the incidence rates per 100 full-time workers for total nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by major industry sector between Missouri and All United States for private industry in 2004.  Incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers.  Incidence rates are compared between Missouri and All United States for private industry and major industry sectors.  Missouri had higher incidence rates than All United States for private industry.  Missouri also had higher incidence rates for goods-producing sectors and the individual major industry sectors of construction and manufacturing.  The incidence rates for Missouri and All United States were the same for natural resources and mining.  Missouri had higher incidence rates than All United States for service-providing sectors and all the individual major industry sectors within the service-providing industries.

Chart 3 presents the incidence rates per 100 full-time workers for total nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2003 and 2004.  The incidence rates in 2004 were higher than the rates in 2003 for private industry; service-providing sectors; financial activities; and educational and health services.  The 2004 incidence rates for goods-producing sectors and all three goods-producing major industry sectors were reduced in 2004 from the 2003 incidence rates.  The 2004 incidence rates were the same as 2003 for trade, transportation, and utilities; information; and other services major industry sectors.

The top industry subsectors (3-digit NAICS code) with the highest nonfatal occupational injury and illness incidence rates per 100 full-time employees for total cases in Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Chart 4.  Primary metal manufacturing (NAICS 331) had the highest incidence rate at 13.8, indicating that there was a rate of 13.8 injuries and illnesses for each 100 full-time employees in that industry subsector.  Warehousing and storage (NAICS 493) was the industry subsector with the second highest incidence rate in Missouri in 2004 at 13.5.

Chart 5 shows the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational illnesses by category of illness in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The category of illness with the largest percentage of illnesses was all other occupational illnesses at 69%.  The next largest category of illness was skin diseases or disorders accounting for 14% of the occupational illnesses in Missouri private industry in 2004.

The incidence rates of lost workday cases, cases with days away from work, and cases with days of restricted work activity only for injuries and illnesses in Missouri private industry are shown in Chart 6.  The incidence rates are presented for 2003 and 2004.  All three rates have increased in 2004.

The numbers of cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction, by case type and private major industry sectors in Missouri in 2004 are shown in Chart 7.  Cases with days away from work are shown separately from cases with job transfer or restriction.

Incidence rates (per 100 full-time workers) of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by selected industries and case types for Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 1.  The incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 200,000 where

N = number of injuries and illnesses
EH = total hours worked by all employees during calendar year
200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year).

The incidence rates are presented for total recordable cases; cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction; and other recordable cases.  Cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction are divided into total cases, cases with days away from work, and cases with job transfer or restriction.  Days away from work cases include those that result in days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction.

Industries are listed as goods-producing and service-providing major industry sectors, and selected sectors and subsector industries identified by 2-digit and 3-digit NAICS codes, respectively.  The incidence rate for private industry in Missouri for 2004 was 5.3 for total recordable cases of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses.  This was increased from an incidence rate of 5.0 in 2003, but reduced from incidence rates of 6.0 in 2002, 6.1 in 2001, and 6.8 in 2000.

Goods-producing industry sectors had an incidence rate of 7.5 for total recordable cases.  This rate was reduced from the 2003 rate of 7.9.  Manufacturing was the goods-producing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate at 7.9.  The incidence rate for manufacturing was reduced from the 2003 rate of 8.4.  Construction was the goods-producing major industry sector with the second highest incidence rate at 6.8, down from 7.1 in 2003.  Manufacturing (NAICS 31-33) was the goods-producing sector with the highest incidence rate at 7.9.  Construction (NAICS 23) was the goods-producing sector with the second highest incidence rate at 6.8.  Primary metal manufacturing (NAICS 331) was the goods-producing subsector with the highest incidence rate at 13.8, up 51.6 percent from 9.1 in 2003. Transportation equipment manufacturing (NAICS 336) was the goods-producing subsector with the second highest incidence rate at 11.2, down 23.3 percent from 14.6 in 2003.  Transportation equipment manufacturing had the highest incidence rate of goods-producing industries in 2003.

Service-providing industry sectors had an incidence rate of 4.6 total recordable cases in 2004.  This was an increase of 12.2 percent from 4.1 in 2003.  Education and health services was the service-providing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate at 6.2, up from 5.8 in 2003.  Trade, transportation, and utilities was the major industry sector with the second highest incidence rate at 5.8.  This rate was the same as the 2003 rate. Transportation and warehousing (NAICS 48-49) was the service-providing sector with the highest incidence rate at 10.3, up 35.5 percent from 7.6 in 2003.  Utilities (NAICS 22) was the service-providing sector with the second highest incidence rate at 8.6.  The service-providing subsector with the highest incidence rate was warehousing and storage (NAICS 493) with an incidence rate of 13.5.  The service-providing subsector with the second highest incidence rate was couriers and messengers (NAICS 492) with an incidence rate of 10.8, down 18.2 percent from 13.2 in 2003.

Table 2 presents the numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by selected industries and case types in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The case and industry categories are the same as those described for Table 1.  There were 99,600 total recordable cases of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in Missouri in 2004.  This was a 5.0 percent increase from the 94,900 cases in 2003, but a reduction from the 112,900 total recordable cases in 2002, the 118,400 cases in 2001 and the 132,000 cases in 2000.

There were 33,400 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the goods-producing sectors in Missouri private industry in 2004.  This was a slight reduction from the 33,900 injuries and illnesses in 2003.  Manufacturing was the goods-producing major industry sector and the goods-producing sector (NAICS 31-33) with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with 24,400.  This was a slight decrease from the 24,700 injuries and illnesses in manufacturing in 2003.  Manufacturing accounted for 73.1 percent of the goods-producing and 24.5 percent of the total private industry injuries and illnesses.  Construction was the goods-producing major industry sector and the goods-producing sector (NAICS 23) with the second highest number of injuries and illnesses with 8,300.  This was reduced from 8,600 injuries and illnesses in construction in 2003.  Transportation equipment manufacturing (NAICS 336) was the selected goods-producing subsector with the most injuries and illnesses with 6,500 cases.  The number of injuries and illnesses was reduced from 7,100 in 2003.  Specialty trade contractors (NAICS 238) was the goods-producing subsector with the second highest number of injuries and illnesses with 4,900 reduced from 5,300 in 2003.

There were 66,200 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the service-providing sectors in Missouri private industry in 2004.  This was an 8.5 percent increase from the 61,000 cases in 2003.  Trade, transportation, and utilities was the service-providing major industry sector with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with 26,200.  This was a reduction from the 27,000 cases in 2003.  Trade, transportation, and utilities accounted for 39.6 percent of the service-providing and 26.3 percent of the total private industry injuries and illnesses.  Education and health services was the service-providing major industry sector with the second highest number of occupational injuries and illnesses with 16,900, up from 15,800 in 2003.  Health care and social assistance (NAICS 62) was the selected service-providing sector with the highest number of injuries and illnesses with 15,900 cases.  Retail trade (NAICS 44-45) was the service-providing sector with the second highest number of injury and illness cases at 12,300 cases, reduced from 12,800 in 2003.  Hospitals (NAICS 622) was the selected service-providing subsector with the most injuries and illnesses with 7,900.  Nursing and residential care facilities (NAICS 623) was the service-providing subsector with the second highest number of injuries and illnesses with 5,100.

The incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry sector and employment size of private industry in Missouri in 2004 are presented in Table 3.  The categories for establishment employment size (number of workers) are 1 to 10; 11 to 49; 50 to 249; 250 to 999; and 1,000 or more.  Private industry establishments with 1,000 or more workers had the highest incidence rate (6.9) of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in 2004.  Establishments with 1,000 or more workers had the highest incidence rates for goods-producing sectors and service-providing sectors.

Table 4 presents incidence rates and numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries by selected industries in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Industries are listed as major industry sectors, and selected sector and subsector industries, identified by 2-digit and 3-digit NAICS codes, respectively.  The incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries for Missouri private industry in 2004 was 4.9, a slight increase from 4.6 in 2003, but reduced from the 2002 rate of 5.5.  The incidence rate of occupational injuries for goods-producing sectors was 6.6, down from 6.9 in 2003.  The goods-producing major industry sector and sector with the highest incidence rate for occupational injuries was manufacturing (NAICS 31-33) with a rate of 6.6, down from 6.9 in 2003.  The goods-producing major industry sector and sector with the second highest incidence rate was construction (NAICS 23) with a rate of 6.5, down from 7.0 in 2003.  The selected goods-producing subsector industry with the highest incidence rate for nonfatal occupational injuries was primary metal manufacturing (NAICS 331) with a rate of 12.3.  This was a 53.8 percent increase from the 2003 rate of 8.0.  The selected goods-producing subsector industry with the second highest nonfatal occupational injury incidence rate in 2004 was wood product manufacturing (NAICS 321) with a rate of 10.3.  This was a 32.1 percent increase from the 2003 rate of 7.8.  The incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries in the service-providing sectors was 4.4.  This is a 12.8 percent increase over the 2003 rate of 3.9.  The service-providing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate of occupational injuries was education and health services with a rate of 5.8, up from 5.4 in 2003.  Trade, transportation, and utilities was the service-providing major industry sector with the second highest incidence rate at 5.6, up slightly from 5.5 in 2003.  The service-providing sector with the highest incidence rate of occupational injuries was transportation and warehousing (NAICS 48-49) with a rate of 9.9.  This rate represents a 50.0 percent increase from the 2003 rate of 6.6.  Utilities (NAICS 22) was the service-providing sector with the second highest incidence rate at 7.6.  The selected service-providing subsector industry with the highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries in Missouri private industry in 2004 was warehousing and storage (NAICS 493) with a rate of 12.5.  The selected service-providing subsector industry with the second highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries in Missouri in 2004 was couriers and messengers (NAICS 492) with an incidence rate of 10.2, down 15.7 percent from 12.1 in 2003.

Incidence rates and numbers of nonfatal occupational illnesses by major industry sector and category of illness for Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 5.  These incidence rates represent the number of illnesses per 10,000 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 20,000,000 where

N = number of injuries and illnesses
EH = total hours worked by all employees during calendar year
20,000,000 = base for 10,000 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year).

The incidence rate for total cases of nonfatal occupational illnesses in Missouri private industry in 2004 was 39.4.  This rate is the same as the 2003 rate.  It is a 19.9 percent reduction from the 2002 rate of 49.2 for total cases of nonfatal occupational illnesses.  The incidence rate for goods-producing industries was 93.0, down 11.5 percent from the 2003 rate of 105.1.  Manufacturing was the goods-producing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational illnesses at 123.9, a decrease of 14.7 percent from the 2003 rate of 145.2.  The incidence rate for service-providing industries was 22.7, an increase of 11.3 percent from the 2003 rate of 20.4.  Education and health services was the service-providing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational illnesses at 39.3.  This was a 23.2 percent increase from the 2003 rate of 31.9.  The number of total cases of nonfatal occupational illnesses in Missouri private industry in 2004 was reduced to 7,400.  This was a reduction from 7,500 cases in 2003, 9,200 cases in 2002, and 11,900 cases in 2001.

Table 6 shows the incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and case types in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Cases are presented as total recordable cases; cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction; and other recordable cases as described for Table 1.  The industries are separated into goods-producing or service-providing and are listed as major industry sectors, sectors (2-digit NAICS code), subsectors (3-digit NAICS code), industry groups (4-digit NAICS code), NAICS industries (5-digit NAICS code), and U.S. industries (6-digit NAICS code).  Primary metal manufacturing (NAICS 331) was the goods-producing industry with the highest incidence rate of total recordable nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in Missouri private industry in 2004 with a rate of 13.8.  This was a 51.6 percent increase from the 2003 rate of 9.1.  Grain and oilseed milling (NAICS 3112) was the goods-producing industry with the second highest incidence rate at 12.4.  Personal and household goods repair and maintenance (NAICS 8114) was the service-providing industry with the highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in Missouri private industry in 2004 with a rate of 15.2.  Warehousing and storage (NAICS 493) was the service-providing industry with the second highest incidence rate at 13.5.

The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and case types for Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 7.  Cases are presented as total recordable cases; cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction; and other recordable cases, as described for Table 1.  The industries are separated into goods-producing or service-providing and are listed as major industry sectors, sectors (2-digit NAICS code), subsectors (3-digit NAICS code), industry groups (4-digit NAICS code), NAICS industries (5-digit NAICS code), and U.S. industries (6-digit NAICS code).  Transportation equipment manufacturing (NAICS 336) was the goods-producing industry with the most (6,500) nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in Missouri private industry in 2004.  But this number was reduced from 7,100 in 2003.  Hospitals (NAICS 622) was the service-providing industry with the most (7,900) nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in Missouri private industry in 2004.

Table 8 presents the incidence rates of nonfatal occupational illnesses by selected industries and category of illness for Missouri private industry in 2004.  The categories of illnesses are: total cases; skin disorders; respiratory conditions; poisonings; hearing loss; and all other illnesses.  Private industry had incidence rates of 39.4 for total cases, 5.3 for skin disorders, 3.2 for respiratory conditions, 0.5 for poisonings, 3.1 for hearing loss, and 27.4 for all other illnesses.  Goods-producing sectors had incidence rates of 93.0 for total cases, 7.9 for skin disorders, 1.5 for respiratory conditions, 1.8 for poisonings, 11.3 for hearing loss, and 70.5 for all other illnesses.  The goods-producing industry with the highest incidence rate for total cases was transportation equipment manufacturing (NAICS 336) with a rate of 337.8.  Food manufacturing (NAICS 311) was the goods-producing industry with the highest incidence rate for skin disorders at 17.5.  Chemical manufacturing (NAICS 325) was the goods-producing industry with the highest incidence rate for respiratory conditions at 10.4.  Transportation equipment manufacturing (NAICS 336) was the goods-producing industry with the highest incidence rate for poisonings at 6.9.  Primary metal manufacturing (NAICS 331) was the goods-producing industry with the highest incidence rate for hearing loss at 78.1.  Transportation equipment manufacturing (NAICS 336) was the goods-producing industry with the highest incidence rate for all other illnesses with an incidence rate of 286.1.  Service-providing sectors had incidence rates of 22.7 for total cases, 3.7 for respiratory conditions, 0.6 for hearing loss, and 13.9 for all other illnesses.  Data was not available for skin disorders.  There were fewer than 15 cases of poisonings.  Museums, historical sites, and similar institutions (NAICS 712) was the service-providing industry with the highest incidence rate for total cases of nonfatal occupational illnesses at 116.3.  Utilities (NAICS 221) was the service-providing industry with the highest incidence rate for skin disorders at 62.0.  Hospitals (NAICS 622) was the service-providing industry with the highest incidence rate for respiratory conditions at 33.1.  All service-providing industries had fewer than 15 poisoning cases each.  Transportation and warehousing (NAICS 48-49) had the highest incidence rate for hearing loss at 5.6.  All service-providing industries except trade, transportation, and utilities; and transportation and warehousing (NAICS 48-49) had less than 15 hearing loss cases.  Warehousing and storage (NAICS 493) was the service-providing industry with the highest incidence rate for all other illnesses at 95.4.

The numbers of nonfatal occupational illnesses by selected industries and category of illness in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Table 9.  The categories of illnesses are the same as those listed for Table 8.  There were 7,400 nonfatal occupational illness cases in Missouri private industry in 2004, down from 7,500 in 2003.  Most, 5,100, or 68.9 percent, of these cases were in the all other illnesses category.  There were 4,100 total illness cases in the goods-producing sectors, down from 4,500 in 2003.  Manufacturing was the goods-producing major industry sector and sector with the most total illness cases with 3,800.  This was an 11.6 percent reduction from the 4,300 cases in 2003.  There were 3,200 total illness cases in the service-providing sectors.  Trade, transportation, and utilities; and education and health services were the service-providing major industry sectors with the most total illness cases with 1,100 each.  The number of illness cases for trade, transportation, and utilities was reduced from 1,500 in 2003.  The number of illness cases for education and health services was increased from 900 in 2003.  Health care and social assistance (NAICS 62) was the service-providing sector with the highest number of total cases of nonfatal occupational illnesses in 2004 with 1,000.

The incidence rates and numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries by industry in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Table 10.  The goods-producing industry with the highest incidence rate in 2004 was primary metal manufacturing (NAICS 331) with an incidence rate of 12.3.  The goods-producing industry with the second highest incidence rate was grain and oilseed milling (NAICS 3112) with an incidence rate of 11.6.  The service-providing industry with the highest incidence rate of occupational injuries was personal and household goods repair and maintenance (NAICS 8114) with a rate of 13.7.  The service-providing industry with the second highest incidence rate was warehousing and storage (NAICS 493) with an incidence rate of 12.5.

Table 11 shows the incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by major industry sector and selected case types in Missouri private industry in 2004 and 2003.  The incidence rates of total recordable cases of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for 2004 were decreased from the 2003 rates in goods-producing industries; natural resources and mining; agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; construction; manufacturing; and retail trade.  The rates for 2004 and 2003 were the same for trade, transportation, and utilities; and information.  The incidence rates increased for 2004 over 2003 for private industry; mining; service-providing industries; and financial activities.