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Diversity Spotlight

Diversity Spotlight

Black History Month

Slideshow

Josephine Baker
Lucille Bluford
Annie Turnbo Malone
Margaret Bush Wilson

To commemorate and celebrate the contributions to our nation made by people of African descent, American historian Carter G. Woodson established Black History Week, with the first celebration occurring on February 12, 1926.  For many years, the second week of February was set aside for this celebration to coincide with the birthdays of abolitionist/editor Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln. In 1976, as part of the nation’s bicentennial, the week was expanded into Black History Month. Every President since Gerald Ford has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month as a way to recognize the accomplishments of African Americans.  Each year, there is a theme for Black History Month, and this year’s theme is “Black Women in American Culture and History.”  Missouri has been fortunate to have had numerous accomplished African American women who have made significant contributions to America’s culture and history, including Josephine Baker, Lucile Bluford, Annie Malone, and Margaret Bush Wilson.

Josephine Baker (born Freda Josephine McDonald) was born in St. Louis on June 3, 1906.  Baker was a world famous singer, dancer, actress and civil rights activist.  After becoming a hugely successful performer in France, Baker returned to the United States and became involved in the civil rights movement.  She refused to perform in segregated concert halls and spoke at the March on Washington on August 28, 1963.  Baker is also remembered for her “Rainbow Tribe,” her twelve adopted children from different racial and ethnic backgrounds, as well as for her participation in the French Resistance during World War II.

Lucile Bluford moved with her family to Kansas City in 1918, when she was seven years old.  Bluford graduated with a journalism degree from the University of Kansas in 1932, after she was unable to attend the University of Missouri because it was not admitting African Americans at the time.  Bluford worked at the Kansas City American newspaper and then at the Kansas City Call newspaper, where she eventually became its editor and publisher.  Bluford also became involved in the Kansas City civil rights movement and was a tireless advocate for human rights in Missouri.  She was the first woman and first African American woman to be appointed to the Missouri Human Rights Commission by Governor James T. Blair, Jr. who stated in his speech before the Missouri General Assembly on January 7, 1959: “A distinguished Human Rights Commission was appointed, which will continue to pursue the state’s objective of assuring equal rights and opportunities for all our citizens…our cause for human rights is a right cause, for on our side there is justice.” Bluford dedicated a large part of her life to breaking down racial barriers to education, including filing several lawsuits against the University of Missouri after being denied admission eleven times.  A half a century later, the University awarded Bluford an honorary doctorate in Humanities.

Annie Turnbo Malone, though born in Illinois, moved her hair products company to St. Louis in 1902.  By the end of World War I, she was one of the most successful black women in the country.  Malone founded Poro College, the first school dedicated to the study and teaching of black cosmetology in the United States in an attempt to offer black women an opportunity to advance.  Malone is also remembered for founding the Annie Malone Children and Family Service Center, which is the oldest facility in St. Louis dedicated to care for disadvantaged youth.

Margaret Bush Wilson was born in St. Louis on January 30, 1919.  After graduating from Lincoln University Law School in 1943, she was hired by the United States Department of Agriculture and soon moved back to St. Louis.  Wilson started with her husband the law firm Wilson and Wilson, where she specialized in real estate law.  In 1946, the Shelleys, an African-American couple, purchased a home in a Missouri neighborhood.  Sometime later, the Kraemers, a white couple, moved into the same neighborhood and went to court to enforce the neighborhood’s racially restrictive covenant.  In 1948, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Shelley v. Kraemer that such racially restrictive covenants were not enforceable.  Wilson was counsel for the Real Estate Brokers Association of St. Louis, which was formed partly because the St. Louis Real Estate Exchange excluded blacks; the new association’s immediate goal was to obtain funds to appeal the Missouri Supreme Court’s contrary ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court.  Wilson also served nine terms as Chair of the NAACP National Board of Directors as well as serving on numerous boards for national companies and non-profit organizations.

You can learn more about these nationally influential women by visiting the State Historical Society of Missouri’s website.  You can also delve further into African-American history and achievements at Biography's Black History site and at African American History Month's website.

There are many ways to celebrate Black History Month during February throughout Missouri:

Cape Girardeau Events

  • February 8, 2012, 12:00 noon, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot: A Discussion of Biology, Bioethics and Culturally Competent Health Care: Panel Discussion at Southeast Missouri State University, University Center, Fourth Floor, Redhawks Room
    Henrietta Lacks, a 31-year-old black mother of five, migrated to Baltimore from the tobacco farms of Virginia. She is known to scientists as HeLa (the method used to identify human cells using the first two letters of the first and last name). Her cervical cells, taken from her without her knowledge or consent, became the first "immortal" human cells grown in culture and are still alive today (even though Henrietta died in 1951). Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold the world-over, contributed to the discoveries of the polio vaccine and AIDS treatments, and lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization and gene mapping. Free and open to the public. Contact: Bobbi J. Palmer at (573) 651-5902 or bjpalmer@semo.edu. View events flyer.
  • Southeast Missouri State University is sponsoring an Open Forum, Learning the Unwritten Rules for African-American Professionals on February 15, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. in the University Center, Fourth Floor, Indian Room. The Forum will focus the on challenges African American men and women face in the workplace and approaches to overcome them. Free and open to the public. Contact: Steven Taylor at (573) 651-2891 or staylor@semo.edu. View event details on SEMO's calendar.

Fulton Event

  • February 12, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Black History Program at Guiding Light Baptist Church
    1023 Westminster Avenue, Rev. Charles Jackson, Pastor Admission is free. Contact: Jack McBride at (573) 642-5462. View events flyer.

Kansas City Events

  • February 2012: The Local Investment Commission (LINC) has produced educational posters and booklets in partnership with The Kansas City Public Library and The Black Archives of Mid-America, with contributions from the Kansas City Star. The poster set celebrates and supports Black History Month from a local perspective. Kansas City leaders highlighted in the 2012 edition are: pastor Samuel W. Bacote, entertainer L.C. "Speedy" Huggins, baseball legend Leroy Robert "Satchel" Paige, physician and activist William J. Thompkins, journalist Roy Wilkins, musician Mary Lou Williams, and teacher Josephine Silone Yates. Learn more, order prints or download the entire Black History Month series at kclinc.org/blackhistory.
  • February 3, 2012, 6:30 p.m., “Freedom Sisters: Stamping, Shouting, Singing Home Tour” at the Kansas City Public Library Plaza Branch, 4801 Main Street
    Friday Night Family Fun
    celebrates Black History Month with The Coterie Theatre’s presentation of this play set in the 1950s Deep South, depicting a world on the verge of change but still tainted by everyday injustices and the remnants of slavery. Grades 5-12. View event site.
  • February 7, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Brother John Anderson - The Buffalo Soldiers: Black Knights of the West at the Kansas City Public Library Westport Branch, 118 Westport Road
    The Kansas City Public Library celebrates Black History Month by hosting Brother John Anderson for performances of The Buffalo Soldiers: Black Knights of the West at two Library branches.
    Repeated: February 7, 2012, 1:00 p.m. at the Waldo Branch, 201 East 75th Street.
    View event listing.
  • February 13, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Tommy Terrific’s Wacky Magic: Tuskegee Airmen at the Kansas City Public Library Southeast Branch, 6242 Swope Parkway
    Tommy Terrific’s Wacky Magic Show honoring the Tuskegee Airmen for ages 4 and up.
    Repeated: February 14, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Westport Branch, 118 Westport Road
    Repeated: February 15, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Trails West Branch, 11401 East 23rd Street
    Repeated: February 16, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Central Library, 14 West 10th Street
    Repeated: February 17, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Waldo Branch, 201 East 75th Street
    View event listing.
  • February 15, 2012, 6:30 p.m., Freedom Seekers: Stories from the Western Underground Railroad at the Kansas City Public Library Plaza Branch, 4801 Main Street
    Local filmmaker Gary Jenkins unveils his new documentary about the western branch of the Underground Railroad that before and during the Civil War transported escaped slaves from the Kansas City area to freedom in the north. At a post-screening discussion Jenkins will be joined by Jimmy S. Johnson III, whose great-grandfather escaped a Platte County slave farm, and William O. Wagnon, who has worked to preserve Topeka’s Ritchie House, once a stop on the Underground Railroad.
    View event listing.
  • February 15, 2012, 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Reflections from the Local Civil Rights Front at Penn Valley Community College, Campus Center, Room 503
    A panel presentation featuring Mamie Hughes, Elvis Sonie Gibson, and Helen Speed about the Civil Rights Movement activities in the Kansas City area from key players who are gathered to share their testimonies.
    Contact: Brianna Davis at (816) 604-4206 orBrianna.Davis@mcckc.edu
    View event listing.
  • February 19, 2012, 2:00 p.m., Blair Kerkhoff: NAIA Basketball & the Civil Rights Movement at the Kansas City Public Library Central Library, 14 West 10th Street
    Kansas City Star sports reporter Blair Kerkhoff explains why the NAIA basketball tournament in Kansas City was instrumental in the demolition of racial barriers in college athletics. Long before the NCAA and NIT tournaments accepted them, college basketball teams from historically black colleges and universities found a home in Kansas City. The basketball tournament of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics was a fixture on the city’s sports calendar; but to African Americans around the country, it meant something special.
    View event listing.
  • February 24, 2012, 6:30 p.m., Emiel Cleaver: “Freedom Is Now” at the Kansas City Public Library Plaza Branch, 4801 Main Street
    Area filmmaker Emiel Cleaver debuts his documentary film about Freedom, Inc., Kansas City’s pioneering African-American political organization. Not only did Freedom, Inc. give many blacks their first taste of politics, for decades it tirelessly fought for self determination for African Americans frustrated with racism and political irrelevancy.
    View event listing.
  • February 27, 2012, 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m., El Shaddai Gospel Choir Concert at Maple Woods Community College Student Center
    Enjoy the sounds of the El Shaddai Sanctuary Choir for an evening of musical entertainment. Coffee and hot beverages provided. Free and open to the public. Contact: Linda Langston at (816) 604-3274 or linda.langston@mcckc.edu
    View event listing.

Saint Louis Events

  • February 4, 2012, 3:00 p.m., African Dance at St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails,
    3455 McKelvey Road
    Tiffany Scott and the African-American Ensemble will take you on a journey through the rich history and traditions of the people of Africa. The audience will experience live drummers and traditional African garments in this program. For all ages. Free and open to the public. Contact: Cherise Taylor at (314) 994-3300 ext. 2241 or ctaylor@slcl.org.
    Repeated: February 6, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Lewis and Clark Branch, 9909 Lewis-Clark Blvd.
    Repeated: February 8, 2012, 7:00 p.m., Headquarters, 1640 S. Lindbergh Boulevard
    Repeated: February 9, 2012, 7:00 p.m., Thornhill Branch, 12863 Willowyck Drive
    Repeated: February 11, 2012, 2:00 p.m., Jamestown Bluffs Branch, 4153 N. Highway 67
    Repeated: February 11, 2012, 7:00 p.m., Jamestown Bluffs Branch, 4153 N. Highway 67
    Repeated: February 13, 2012, 6:30 p.m., Eureka Hills Branch, 103 Hilltop Village Center
    Repeated: February 18, 2012, 2:00 p.m., Tesson Ferry Branch, 9920 Lin-Ferry Drive
    Repeated: February 22, 2012, 6:30 p.m., Natural Bridge Branch, 7606 Natural Bridge Road
    Repeated: February 25, 2012, 2:00 p.m., Samuel C. Sachs Branch, 16400 Burkhardt Place
    View event listing.
  • February 6, 2012, All Day, African American Read-In Chain at all St. Louis Public Library 
    The St. Louis Public Library joins the National Council of Teachers of English in a celebration of African-American authors. Be a link in the African-American Read-In Chain. Contact your Branch to reserve seating.
    View event listing.
  • February 6, 2012, 10:00 a.m., “Where Would We Be Without Thee?” Celebrating Black Women in American History and Culture at St. Louis Public Library Barr Branch, 1701 S. Jefferson Avenue
    Renowned storyteller Loretta Washington portrays Phyllis Wheatley, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman in this original program that celebrates the contributions of African- American women. Grades 3-6. Admission is free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    View event listing.
  • February 6, 2012, 10:00 a.m., “Our Eyes Are Watching Zora” at the St. Louis Public Library Machacek Branch, 6424 Scanlan Avenue
    View the documentary “Zora Neale Hurston: Jump at the Sun.” Hurston, path-breaking novelist, pioneering anthropologist, and one of the first Black women to enter the American literary canon, established the African-American vernacular as one of the most vital, inventive voices in American literature. This definitive biography, 18 years in the making, portrays Zora in all her complexity: gifted, flamboyant and controversial but always fiercely original. Adults. California Newsreel, 2008. (83 min.). Free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    Repeated: February 27, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Schlafly Branch, 225 North Euclid Avenue
    View event listing
  • February 8, 2012, 1:30 p.m., Film - At the River I Stand at the St. Louis Public Library Cabanne Branch, 1106 Union Boulevard
    Documentary of two 1968 events in the Civil Rights Movements – the Sanitation Workers Strike in Memphis, Tennessee, and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The film shows how the black community, local civil rights leaders and AFSCME mobilized behind the strikers in mass demonstrations and a boycott of downtown businesses. Adults. Free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    View event listing
  • February 8, 2012, 3:30 p.m., Seeking the Past at the St. Louis Public Library Kingshighway Branch, 2260 S. Vandeventer Avenue
    Learn more about African-American women of achievement by completing a fun scavenger hunt through the branch. Grades K-5/Families. Free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    Repeated: February 13, 2012, 3:30 p.m., Cabanne Branch, 1106 Union Boulevard
    Repeated: February 22, 2012, 3:30 p.m., Baden Branch, 8448 Church Road
    Repeated: February 29, 2012, 3:30 p.m., Walnut Park Branch, 5760 West Florissant Ave.
    View event listing.
  • February 13, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Monday Film and Discussion Series: “For My People: The Life and Writing of Margaret Walker” at the St. Louis Public Library Schlafly Branch, 225 N. Euclid Avenue
    This film gives the long-overdue recognition to one of American literature’s seminal figures. California Newsreel, 1998. (28 min.)  Free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    View event listing.
  • February 13, 2012, 6:30 p.m., African Storytelling & Percussion – COCA at the St. Louis County Library Florissant Valley Branch, 195 New Florissant Road S.
    Enjoy this integrated storytelling and musical performance with audience interaction with an accomplished musician and performer of West African and Caribbean percussion instruments. For all ages. Free and open to the public. Contact: Cherise Taylor at (314) 994-3300 ext. 2241 or ctaylor@slcl.org.
    Repeated: February 22, 2012, 6:30 p.m., Prairie Commons Branch, 915 Utz Lane
    Repeated: February 25, 2012, 2:00 p.m., Indian Trails Branch, 8400 Delport Drive
    Repeated: February 27, 2012, 7:00 p.m., Mid-County Branch, 7821 Maryland Avenue
    View event listing.
  • February 14, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Tuesday Film Series: “Ida B. Wells: A Passion for Justice” at the St. Louis Public Library Julia Davis Branch, 4415 Natural Bridge Avenue
    Chronicles the life of early African-American journalist and activist Ida B. Wells. Wells protested lynchings, the treatment of black soldiers ,and other forms of racism and injustice around the turn of the century. Free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    View event listing.
  • February 18, 2012, 9:00 a.m. – 4;00 p.m., St. Louis African-American History and Genealogy Society Conference, Clay Education Center of Harris-Stowe State University, 10 North Compton
    Special guests will be Charles Brown, president, and Bridget Ford Stegall, chairperson. Admission is $35 for members and $40 for non-members. Contact: Bridget Ford Stegall at (314) 773-3332 or stl-aahgs.com.
    View event listing.
  • February 18, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Discussion for Sylvester Brown, Jr. at Afro World, 7276 Natural Bridge Road
    Discuss current issues regarding African-Americans with columnist Sylvester Brown, Jr., a freelance journalist, founder of When We Dream Together, Inc., former publisher of Take Five magazine, former columnist with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and current researcher, consultant, and writing coach with SmileyBooks in New York. Contact: (314) 389-1717.
    View event listing.
  • February 21, 2012, 2:00 p.m., Sunshine 55+: “Remembering African-American Lives” at the St. Louis County Library Indian Trails Branch, 8400 Delport Drive
    Using a variety of different sources, including videos, music, and memorabilia, we’ll explore the struggles and triumphs of African-Americans throughout our country’s history. Registration recommended. Free and open to the public. Contact: Cherise Taylor at (314) 994-3300 ext. 2241 or ctaylor@slcl.org.
    View event listing.
  • February 23, 2012, 5:30 p.m., Zora Neal Hurston: Black Anthropologist, St. Louis Public Library Walnut Park Branch, 5760 W. Florissant Avenue
    Jason Vasser discusses the Harlem Renaissance as it relates to the creative arts and serves as a vehicle for social commentary and dialogue. The presentation references anthropologists Katherine Dunham and Zora Neale Hurston as women and artists. Adults. Free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    View event listing.

    Date: February 23, 2012, 7:00 p.m., Stories & Craft at the St. Louis Public Library Schlafly Branch, 225 North Euclid Avenue
    Make an African rain stick. Families. Admission is free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    View event listing.

  • February 25, 2012, 8:00a.m. , National TRIO Day Celebration at Harris-Stowe State University, 3026 Laclede Avenue
    Catch the Dream” is the 2012 National TRIO Day Celebration’s theme. As the host institution, Harris-Stowe has centered the idea of equal rights in education and athletics, as the campus once housed the Negro Leagues’ baseball diamond. Benny Lewis will serve as the keynote speaker discussing St. Louis stars of the original Negro National League. Contact: Linda Todoroff at (314) 340-5796.
    View event listing.
  • February 25, 2012, 3:30 p.m., “Where Were You When….?” at the St. Louis County Library
    Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road
    Where were you when they marched on Washington? Where were you when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat? Come and share your story of where you were during major events of the Civil Rights Movement. Light refreshments provided. Adults. Room 1. Free and open to the public. Contact: Cherise Taylor at (314) 994-3300 #2241 or ctaylor@slcl.org.
    View event listing.
  • February 26, 2012, 2:00 p.m., St. Louis Public Library Black History Month Event, Angela Davis, Keynote Speaker at Christ Church Cathedral, 1210 Locust Street
    Angela Davis is a social equality activist, author and professor. Drawing on experiences in the early 1970s, her work’s persistent theme has been the range of social problems associated with incarceration and the generalized criminalization of those communities that are most affected by poverty and racial discrimination. She also conducted extensive research on numerous issues related to race, gender and imprisonment. Free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    View event listing.
  • February 27, 2012, 2:00 p.m., Black Cowboy Museum, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road
    Come learn about a part of history. View our museum all about African-American cowboys. Refreshments will be served. All ages. Room 1. Free and open to the public. Contact: Cherise Taylor at (314) 994-3300 ext. 2241 or ctaylor@slcl.org.
    View event listing
  • Date: February 28, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Tuesday Film Series: “Rivers of Change: The Legacy of Five Unheralded Women in Montgomery and Their Struggle for Justice and Dignity: A Documentary” at St. Louis Public Library Julia Davis Branch, 4415 Natural Bridge Avenue
    This documentary chronicles events and key players in the legal protest to end unequal treatment on Montgomery city buses. Narrated by various individuals with first-hand accounts, the film incorporates video stock archives and news clippings of the boycott’s events and the subsequent federal trial, Browder vs. Gayle. Free and open to the public. Contact: Leandrea Lucas at (314) 367-4120 or llucas@slpl.org.
    View event listing.
  • Contact your St. Louis branch for more information at http://www.slpl.org/ or http://www.slcl.org/.

Springfield Events

  • February 6, 2012, 7:00 p.m., African-American Read-In: Storytelling at Drury University
    Diversity Center, 900 North Benton
    An evening of poetry, music and stories written and composed by African-American authors. Free. Contact: Dr. Grace Jackson-Brown at (417) 836-4547 or Gjackson-Brown@missouristate.edu.
    View event listing.
  • February 7, 2012, National Black AIDS Awareness Day, Missouri State University, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Plaster Student Union 308C and 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Plaster Student Union 315C
    Free HIV/AIDS, STD, Hepatitis C testing.
    View event listing
  • February 7, 2012, 7:00 p.m., National Black AIDS Awareness Day: “HIV/AIDS in the Black Community” presented by Stephanie Washington at Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union 312A
    Sponsored by Association of Black Collegians. Contact: Tony Hines at 417-836-5334 or tony100@live.missouristate.edu
    View event listing.
  • February 8, 2012, 6:00 pm, LGBT and African American Communities Forum – Part II” at Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union 315, 901 South National
    A discussion regarding the challenges facing both communities in affirming one another. Contact: Tony Hines at 417-836-5334 or Tony100@live.missouristate.edu
    View event listing.
  • February 8, 2012, 9:00 p.m., Film: “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide…. When the Rainbow is Enuf” at Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union Theatre, 901 South National
    A film regarding the challenges, struggles and personal growth of African-American women. Free. Contact: Tara Benson at (417) 836-4386 or StudentEngagement@missouristate.edu.
    Repeated: February 12, 2012, 9:00 p.m.
    View event listing.
  • February 9, 2012, 7:30 p.m., Theatrical Production: “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide….When the Rainbow is Enuf” at Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union Theatre, 901 South National
    A theatrical production illustrating the challenges, struggles and personal growth of African-American women. Sponsored by the Missouri State University Theatre Department. Contact: Dr. Bob Willenbrink at (417) 836-4400 or TheatreandDance@missouristate.edu.
    Repeated: February 10, 2012, 7:30 p.m.      
    Repeated: February 11, 2012, 7:30 p.m.
    Repeated: February 12, 2012, 2:30 p.m.
    View event listing.
  • February 13, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Trip to Dr. MLK Monument: Discussion and Planning Meetings” at Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union 315C, 901 South National
    An opportunity to provide input and gather information on plans for an educational and entertaining trip to the MLK Monument in Washington, DC during Fall 2012. Contact: Natasha Winston at 417-836-5517 or NatashaWinston@missouristate.edu
    Repeated: February 14, 2012, 6:00 p.m.
    View event listing.

    February 15, 2012, 7:00 p.m., “Nannie Helen Burroughs and the Fight for Racial Justice,” presented by Dr. Angela Hornsby-Gutting at Missouri State University, Glass Hall 102
    Dr. Gutting will highlight the achievements and contributions of Burroughs (1879-1961), a prominent African-American educator, an important civil rights and women’s rights activist, and a noted figure in the National Baptist Convention. Free. Contact: Dr. Matthew Calihman at (417) 836-5107 or MatthewCalihman@missouristate.edu.
    View event listing.

  • February 16, 2012, 12:00 Noon, Brown Bag Lunch: Women & Girls Lead Film Screening of “Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock” at Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union 313
    As a black woman who was a feminist before the term was invented, Daisy Bates refused to accept her assigned place in society. The film tells the story of her life and public support of nine black students who registered to attend the all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, which culminated in a constitutional crisis – pitting a president against a governor and a community against itself. Unconventional, revolutionary, and egotistical, Daisy Bates reaped the rewards of instant fame, but paid dearly for it.  Contact: Kelly Barnts at 417-836-3043 or KellyBarnts@missouristate.edu
    View event listing.
  • February 21, 2012, 7:00 p.m., The State of Black College Students, at Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union, 901 South National
    A documentary and discussion exploring various aspects of college life through the lens of African-American students. Free. Contact: Charlotte Hardin at (417) 836-3043 or multiculturalstudentservices@missouristate.edu.
    View event listing.
  • February 24, 2012, 7:30 p.m., Soul Bowl at Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union, Level One Game Center, 901 South National
    An evening of bowling, billiards, and big fun, including soul music and refreshments. Free. Contact: Tara Benson at (417) 836-4386 or StudentEngagement@missouristate.edu.
    View event listing.
  • February 28, 2012, 12:00 Noon, Guest Speaker – Dr. Debbye Turner, Missouri State University, Plaster Student Union Theatre, 901 South National
    A conversation with former Miss America and national news media personality. Free. Contact: Tara Benson at (417) 836-4386 or StudentEngagement@missouristate.edu.
    View event listing.
  • February 29, 2012, 7:30 p.m., Ballet Memphis at Missouri State University, Hammons Hall for the Performing Arts, Corner of Cherry and John Q. Hammons Parkway
    A showcase of culture and diversity expressed through collaborations with hip-hop dancers, urban poets, rap artists, jazz orchestras and gospel choirs. Admission is $16 - $26. Sponsored by the Missouri State University Hammons Hall for the Performing Arts. Contact: Enoch Morris at (417) 836-7678 or MissouriStateTix@missouristate.edu.
    View event listing.

Contact

Missouri Commission on Human Rights
3315 W. Truman Blvd., Rm 212
P.O. Box 1129
Jefferson City, MO 65102-1129
Phone: 573-751-3325
Toll-Free Complaint Hotline: 1-877-781-4236
Relay Missouri: 711
Relay Missouri: 1-800-735-2966 (TDD)
Fax: 573-751-2905
mchr@labor.mo.gov